Twitter, Preconceptions and Overcoming Prejudice

By Jaya Pathak


'Anyone can do, say or be anything online, and the blurred line between what is real and what isn’t is difficult to get past'


Navigating yourself through a political environment is tough. Add in the fact that you are from an ethnic minority, a woman and are young, it gets even more difficult. This experience isn’t unique to just myself but is shared by many others who are from similar backgrounds or who seem to be “different” from what is perceived as “normal” in our society.

The concept of having pre-conceived ideas about those we do not know is an understandable one. It is simply human nature for our mind to do what it has been trained to do from a very young age - to use our experiences and the experiences of those around us to form conclusions about the unknown. The conventions of modern-day society do nothing but reaffirm this concept, and it requires a lot of patience, time and effort to work through our unknown prejudices and bias. All of this is just in the real world; the online world exasperates this notion hugely. Anyone can do, say or be anything online, and the blurred line between what is real and what isn’t is difficult to get past. It can become difficult to realise that even those who are honest about who they are online, are more than just their username or display picture.


Twitter Laptop